Lunch

Tuesday 29 January 2019

12:30pm

The Future is Asian

Parag Khanna in conversation with Agatha Kratz

In the 19th century, the world was Europeanized. In the 20th century, it was Americanized. Now, in the 21st century, the world is being irreversibly Asianized.

What happens when Asia no longer just produces for the West but the West produces for Asia? And when Asians don’t aspire to live like the West but rather Western societies wish they had Asians’ stability and far-sighted leadership?

Parag Khanna’s latest book, The Future is Asian, presents this irrepressible global Asianization through detailed analysis, data and maps of Asia’s major markets and their combined impact on the global economy, society and governance.

Parag Khanna

Parag is Managing Partner of FutureMap, a scenario planning and strategic advisory firm. He has been a fellow at Brookings, New America, and the Lee Kuan Yew School at the National University of Singapore, as well as an advisor to the US National Intelligence Council and US Special Operations Forces.

He holds a PhD from the London School of Economics and bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University. He is a Young Global Leader of the World Economic Forum.

Agatha Kratz

Agatha is an Associate Director at Rhodium Group where she focuses on European Union-China relations, China’s economic diplomacy and the Belt and Road Initiative.

She was previously Associate Policy Fellow at the European Council on Foreign Relations (ECFR) and Editor-in-Chief of China Analysis, ECFR’s quarterly journal.

Agatha was educated at SciencesPo Paris, the London School of Economics and Columbia University School of International and Public Affairs.

"Understanding the global economy in this century means above all understanding that it is likely to be an Asian Century. Parag Khanna’s important book provides a rich perspective going well beyond the economic statistics. Everyone concerned with the future of the global economy should consider its arguments."

Lawrence H. Summers